Policy Plans

Racial Equity Federal Agenda 2022

” These recommendations will help provide a real framework, for real solutions to help make real change to Forster equity that expands opportunities for underserved communiteies and populations in energy, environment, transportation and public health. This is and important moment in history, we cannot become spectators or just consumers while these significant investments are being made in clean energy, transportation and the environment”State Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Directory of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition

“There’s an urgency now to engage and elevate opportunities for vulnerable and frontline communities who have borne the brunt of transportation emissions due to historical and systematic injustices. This may be our only chance to leverage this transformational funding to accelerate multimodal EV adoption and workforce and economic development opportunities while also improving public health.” – Dr. Shelley Francis, Co-Founder of EVNOIRE

2022 Federal Priorities for Advancing Racial Equity in Energy, Environment & Transportation

Eight Key Points

1. Funding for targeted EV Education / Community Outreach & Marketing to Increase EV Adoption in BIPOC/Underrepresented Communities who are often impacted first and worst from transportation emissions.

2. Funding to increase Diverse Businesses in the E-Mobility Sector with research funding to explore the opportunities across sectors and the supply chain.

3. Targeted funding for technical assistance and grants for the support of E-Mobility Workforce & Economic Inclusion / E-Mobility HBCU / HSI Fellowship Programs.

4. Funding for Research, Data Collection, Monitoring & Evaluation of Multimodal Electrification (e.g. understanding the Public Health Impacts / Solutions specific to underrepresented and frontline communities)

5. Convening of E-Mobility Equity Policy Forums / Listening Sessions / Followed by Report (Outlining Action Items).

6. Request meeting/s with this group at a regular cadence with White House to foster an ongoing communications loop and ensure that initiatives are progressing – Potential working group

7. Connect with White House for a multimodal EV event during National Drive Electric Week in September 2022. EVHybridNoire is one of the four international organizers of this annual event.

8. Create provisions for diverse vendors, contractors, consultants and e-mobility businesses to make it easier to do business and receive federal / state certifications, contracts, and other business opportunities. Prompt payment, pre-bid meetings, and set-aside projects are a just a few suggestions to enhance opportunities for diverse businesses.

Discussion Members and Stock Holders

(Jill Hamilton ,Shelley Francis , Terry Travis, Kimberly Harden, Joshua Aviv, Paul Francis, Evette Ellis, Korey Neal, Sheryl E. Ponds , Luis MAcDonald, R. Denise Everson)

EV For All 2022

Referenced material:

Washington Post

2022 Electric Vehicles For All Bill Proposal

Supporters: 

Matt Petersen
President & CEO
Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator

Andrea Marpillero-Colomina Clean Transportation Advocate GreenLatinos

Katherine Garcia
Clean Transportation for All Campaign Director Sierra Club

Elizabeth Gore
Senior Vice President, Political Affairs Environmental Defense Fund

Leslie Aguayo
Climate Equity Program Manager The Greenlining Institute

Mac McKinney
Senior Advisor, Federal Government Affairs Edison International

Isaac Vanderburg CEO
Launch Alaska

Peter O’Connor Policy Director Plug In America

Chuck Feinberg
Executive Director
New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition

Alberto Ayala
Executive Director and Air Pollution Control Officer Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District

Wayne Nastri
Executive Officer
South Coast Air Quality Management District

Mary Leslie
President
Los Angeles Business Council

Heidi Sickler Director of Policy AMPLY Power

Jonathan Parfrey Executive Director Climate Resolve

Raj Dhillon
Senior Manager, Advocacy & Public Policy Breathe Southern California

Marc Carrel
President & CEO
The Emphysema Foundation of America

Paul Koretz
City Council Member City of Los Angeles

Jason Anderson President & CEO Cleantech San Diego

Travis Madsen
Transportation Program Director Southwest Energy Efficiency Project

Sven Thesen Founder
Project Green Home

Katherine Stainken
Sr. Director, EV Policy Electrification Coalition

Patrick Guild
Chief Operating Officer
Breathe California Sacramento Region

Kate Meis Wright
Executive Director
Local Government Commission

Ellie Cohen
CEO
The Climate Center

Aric Ohana
CEO
Envoy Technologies

Charles Griffith
Climate and Energy Program Director Ecology Center (Michigan)

Tom Knox
Executive Director
Valley CAN (Clean Air Now)

Active Discussions

Electric Vehicle Panel At NY State Diverse Legislators Conference

April 8th 2022

Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition in conjunction with EVHybridNoire , Lime and NYSERDA spoke as a diverse collection of representatives.

2022 EPA’s Clean Bus Program

April 5th 2022

Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Ave, N.W. Washington, DC 20460

To Whom It May Concern,

I am writing on behalf of the Greater Washington Clean Cities Coalition (GWRCCC) to comment on the EPA’s Clean Bus funding program. Our Coalition is one of the 90+ Clean Cities Coalitions around the country supported by the US Department of Energy. GWRCCC is a public-private partnership composed of representatives of the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, the District government, regional governments, national trade associations, public and private companies and public utility companies including Washington Gas. We are headquartered in the District of Columbia and have programmatic responsibility for the region including District of Columbia, Northern Virginia and Maryland. The mission of our Coalition is to promote the use of clean domestic fuels to assure our nation’s and region’s climate security, energy independence and clean air by reducing our dependence on gasoline and diesel transportation fuels.

Firstly, increasing federal funding for clean school buses is a critical objective in protecting the health and wellness of children, especially in underserved communities. Bus depots are more likely to be located in underserved communities, and consequently it is in these neighborhoods that buses spend a disproportionate amount of time idling, driving, and emitting toxic exhaust. Therefore, the health consequences of diesel school buses fall largely on children in underserved communities. Additionally, children in underserved communities are more likely to ride the bus to school as opposed to being dropped off by their parents. A study published by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in 2001–over two decades ago–found that children riding in diesel school buses are exposed to four times the level of toxic exhaust as children riding in a car, and that because of these exhaust levels children riding diesel school buses are subject to 23-46 times the cancer risk considered significant under federal law. Children from low-income families also have an elevated prevalence of asthma (11% in families below the poverty threshold compared to 9% in families above the threshold and 6.8% in families making twice the threshold), which increases susceptibility to respiratory problems caused by air pollution exposure. Students with asthma missed 13.8 million days of school in 2013, making uneven asthma prevalence not only an issue of health equity but an issue of education equity.

Secondly, the GWRCCC seeks not only to underscore the NRDC study’s recommendation that federal, state, and local governments make significant additional funding available for the purchase of cleaner alternative fuel school buses, but also to emphasize that these governments must ensure that the underserved communities which are most in need and suffer the greatest consequences of air pollution are the beneficiaries of this funding. From an equity lens, the neglect of this point compounds the injustices long borne by underserved communities, most notably the impacts of air pollution from highways which were systemically sited in poor and minority communities. Electric school buses represent the cutting edge of green technology, and equitable access to this technology must also be considered as a contributor to equitable access to health and education.

Finally, by focusing funding efforts on retrofitting diesel buses (to electric)–which costs one-third to one-half the price of new buses– governments can deliver the benefits of better environmental health to a greater number of communities and help underserved communities reach sustainability goals sooner, thus accelerating improvements to the health and wellness of kids, families and communities.

Thank you for considering our comments. For further questions, please contact me at 202-671-1580.

Sincerely,
Antoine M. Thompson
Executive Director
Greater Washington Clean Cities Coalition (GWRCCC)

2022 Transportation and Environment Budget Hearing

March 29, 2022

Dear Chair Cheh and members of the Transportation and Environment Committee,

Good morning.

My name is Antoine M. Thompson, Executive Director of the Greater Washington Region Clean Cities Coalition (GWRCCC). I am also a homeowner in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. Our Coalition is one of the 90+ Clean Cities Coalitions around the country supported by the US Department of Energy. We are a public-private partnership composed of representatives of the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, the District government, regional governments, national trade associations, public and private companies and public utility companies including Washington Gas. We are headquartered in the District of Columbia and have programmatic responsibility for the region including District of Columbia, Northern Virginia and Maryland. 

The mission of our Coalition is to promote the use of clean domestic fuels to assure our nation’s and region’s climate security, energy independence and clean air by reducing our dependence on gasoline and diesel transportation fuels. 

I personally have been engaged in the clean transportation work for more than 20 years, including being a New York State Senator and the former chair of the NY Senate Standing Committee on Environmental Conservation championing green initiatives, climate justice, and expanding access to and investments in public transit. 

I am here to give testimony regarding the proposed city budget. 

I would like to thank the Council and the various departments for their leadership in promoting alternative fuels in transportation. Thanks also to the Department of Energy for its past and present efforts in building alternative fuel corridors as well as to DOT, DDOT, DPW and DC Water for their support of EV charging, circulator buses and promoting biodiesel in vehicles. 

First of all, GWRCCC strives to ensure a just and equitable clean energy transition. It is important to accelerate the investment of local dollars to address equity issues in the district including access to clean air in vulnerable and underserved communities. We know that food deserts and banking deserts exist in DC, but now there also exists charging deserts. Improving air quality in DC for all communities requires public investment in improving public charging throughout DC. GWRCCC asks the city to invest local resources into ensuring access to EV charging in DC’s public spaces in the next 24 months by installing charging stations at public parks, recreation centers, schools, libraries, senior centers, government buildings and train stations. We would like the Council and the Mayor to fund two pilot curbside charging projects, including signage indicating that access to charging is free and public. 

Second, GWRCCC asks that the city invest in our SAVE Program. The SAVE (Support and Assistance for Vehicle Electrification) Program would provide financial assistance to homeowners, small businesses, individuals, and non-profits to retrofit homes and businesses for EV charging. SAVE would also provide financial assistance for individuals and businesses to purchase new and used electric vehicles. 

Finally, GWRCCC asks the committee to create an Environmental Equity Commission to report to the council and the mayor annually on its environmental equity findings.

Thank you again for your time, your leadership, and your assistance.